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You Want Pies With That?: “Watermelon” Ice Cream Pie

"Watermelon" Ice Cream Pie

"Watermelon" Ice Cream Pie

Without further ado….Mary & Rebecca have chosen to test us with a

Taste of Summer Pie.
This month, we’re challenging you to come up with a pie that tastes like the summer.

For some, that might mean getting inspired by the flavors of peak-of-the-season fruits and vegetables, homemade ice cream, carnival food, campfire s’mores, cookouts, beach and ballpark concessions, county fairs, ice-cold floats and lemonade.

But for others, summer brings on thoughts of sunburns and mosquitos, humidity, bored kids, poison ivy and a longing to see that big yellow school bus pull up in front of the house.

So, feel free to take your inspiration from either side of the summer (or both), and use your pie to express how YOU really feel about the summer.

What does summer taste like to you?

YOU WANT PIES WITH THAT?

"Watermelon" Ice Cream Pie ... a taste of summer!

"Watermelon" Ice Cream Pie ... a taste of summer!

Sugar Cone Crust:    I like to use a sugar cone crust.   A standard size box typically has 12 cones.  Finely grind all 12 sugar cones in a food processor.  Place the crumbs in a bowl and add 6-7  tablespoons of melted butter, stirring until combined.  Press the crumbs into a deep dish pie plate.  Place in the freezer while you let the ice cream soften.

Ice Cream Layers:  The bottom layer of the watermelon pie should be a “green” colored sherbert or ice cream.  This time I used Blue Bunny Pistachio Almond ice cream.   Set the ice cream out at room temperature until it is just soft enough to spread over the bottom and up the sides of your sugar cone crust.  This layer is meant to be the “rind” of the watermelon.  Place the sugar cone crust and the pistachio ice cream layer back into the freezer. 

Use a “pink” colored sherbert or ice cream for the center of your watermelon pie.  I chose a strawberry ice cream.   Set the ice cream out at room temperature until it is just soft enough to stir in about 1 cup of mini chocolate chips (seeds).  Spoon this mixture on top of the “green” layer.   Return to the freezer for several hours before serving.

A taste of summer.

A taste of summer.

Daring Bakers: Bakewell Tart …er…pudding

Bakewell Tart

Bakewell Tart

THE CHALLENGE:   The June Daring Bakers’ challenge was hosted by Jasmine of Confessions of a Cardamom Addict and Annemarie of Ambrosia and Nectar. They chose a Traditional (UK) Bakewell Tart… er… pudding that was inspired by a rich baking history dating back to the 1800’s in England.

Bakewell tarts…er…puddings combine a number of dessert elements but still let you show off your area’s seasonal fruits.

Like many regional dishes there’s no “one way” to make a Bakewell Tart…er…Pudding, but most of today’s versions fall within one of two types. The first is the “pudding” where a layer of jam is covered by an almondy pastry cream and baked in puff pastry. The second is the “tart” where a rich shortcrust pastry holds jam and an almondy sponge cake-like filling.

The version we were dared to make is a combination of the two: a sweet almond-flavoured shortcrust pastry, frangipane and jam.

Bakewell Tart

Bakewell Tart

Bakewell Tart…er…pudding

Makes one 23 cm (9” tart)
Baking time: 30 minutes
Equipment needed: 23 cm (9”) tart pan or pie tin (preferably with ridged edges), rolling pin

One quantity sweet shortcrust pastry (recipe follows)
Bench flour
250 ml (1 cup (8 US fl. oz)) jam or curd, warmed for spreadability  (The recipe I used
                                                                                                                         follows.)

One quantity frangipane (recipe follows)
One handful blanched, flaked almonds

Assembling the tart
Place the chilled dough disc on a lightly floured surface.  If  it’s overly cold, you will need to let it set out at room temperature for about 15 minutes before you roll it out.  Flour the rolling pin and roll the pastry to 5 mm (1/4”) thickness, by rolling in one direction only (start from the center and roll away from you), and turning the disc a quarter turn after each roll.  When the pastry is to the desired size and thickness, transfer it to the tart pan, press in and trim the excess dough.  Patch any holes or tears with trimmed bits.  Chill in the freezer for 15 minutes.

Preheat oven to 200C/400F.

Remove shell from freezer, spread as even a layer as you can of jam onto the pastry base.  Top with frangipane, spreading to cover the entire surface of the tart. Smooth the top and pop into the oven for 30 minutes.  Five minutes before the tart is done, the top will be poofy and brownish.  Remove from oven and strew flaked almonds on top and return to the heat for the last five minutes of baking.  The finished tart will have a golden crust and the frangipane will be tanned, poofy and a bit spongy-looking.  Remove from the oven and cool on the counter.  Serve warm, with crème fraîche, whipped cream or custard sauce if you wish.  When you slice into the tart, the almond paste will be firm, but slightly squidgy and the crust should be crisp but not tough.

Sweet shortcrust pastry

30 g (1 oz) sugar
2.5 ml (½ tsp) salt
110 g (4 oz) unsalted butter, cold (frozen is better)
2  egg yolks
2.5 ml (½ tsp) almond extract (optional)  (I added the almond extract.)
15-30 ml (1-2 Tbsp) cold water  (I used the full 2 Tablespoons.)

Sift together flour, sugar and salt.  Grate butter into the flour mixture, using the large hole-side of a box grater.  Using your finger tips only, and working very quickly, rub the fat into the flour until the mixture resembles bread crumbs. Set aside.  Lightly beat the egg yolks with the almond extract (if using) and quickly mix into the flour mixture.  Keep mixing while dribbling in the water, only adding enough to form a cohesive and slightly sticky dough.  Form the dough into a disc, wrap in cling and refrigerate for at least 30 minutes.  (This sweet shortcrust pastry can be made in a food processor.)

Jam Layer – Pineapple, Lime, Vanilla

From:   Sky-High: Irresistible Triple-Layer Cakes
By:  Alisa Huntsman and Peter Wynne

1 can (20 ounce) crushed pineapple in juice  (no added sugar)
1 cup sugar
¼ cup freshly squeezed lime juice  (I used a little more.)
1  one inch piece of vanilla bean split in half

Combine the pineapple, sugar and lime juice in a pan.  Add the vanilla seeds you scraped from the vanilla bean.  (I tossed in the vanilla bean pieces for added flavor.  Just remember to remove them when cooking is complete.)  Warm over a medium-low heat, stirring to dissolve the sugar, 2 to 3 minutes.  Raise the heat to medium and simmer, stirring occasionally, until the juices have almost completely evaporated and its turned jam-like in consistency. (This takes a while, do not expect it to happen in just a few minutes.  Watch so it does not burn.)  Can be made a day in advance and refrigerated.  

Frangipane

125 g (4.5 oz) unsalted butter, softened
125 g (4.5 oz) icing sugar 
3  eggs
2.5 ml (½ tsp) almond extract
125 g (4.5 oz) ground almonds
30 g (1 oz) all purpose flour

Cream butter and sugar together for about a minute or until the mixture is primrose in colour and very fluffy.  Scrape down the side of the bowl and add the eggs, one at a time, beating well after each addition.  The batter may appear to curdle.  In the words of Douglas Adams: Don’t panic.  Really.  It’ll be fine.  After all three are in, pour in the almond extract and mix for about another 30 seconds and scrape down the sides again.  With the beaters on, spoon in the ground nuts and the flour.  Mix well.  The mixture will be soft, keep its slightly curdled look (mostly from the almonds) and retain its pale yellow color.

The Cake Slice: Pina Colada Cake

Pina Colada Cake

Pina Colada Cake

THE CAKE SLICE bakers decided to take a “trip” to the islands with this month’s Pina Colada Cake!

Pina Colada Cake
From:   Sky-High: Irresistible Triple-Layer Cakes
By:  Alisa Huntsman and Peter Wynne

Brown Sugar Cake  (makes three 9″ layers)
3¾ cups cake flour
1¾ tsp baking soda
1 tsp baking powder
½ tsp salt
2¼ cups packed light brown sugar
2 sticks (8 ounces) unsalted butter, at room temperature
1¾ cups buttermilk
5 eggs
2 tsp vanilla extract

Cake method
Preheat the oven to 350 degrees F.   Butter and line the base of three 9 inch cake pans.   (I butter my pans, place the parchment paper bottom liners in the pans and then butter the top of the parchment paper liners as well.)

Sift together the flour, baking soda, baking powder and salt into a large mixing bowl.  Whisk gently to combine.  Add the brown sugar, butter and 1½ cups of the buttermilk to the dry ingredients.  With the mixer on low blend to incorporate.  Raise the speed to medium and beat until light and fluffy, 2 to 3 minutes.

Whisk the eggs with the remaining ¼ cup buttermilk and the vanilla and add to the batter in 3 additions, scraping down the sides of the bowl well and beating only long enough to incorporate between additions.  Divide the batter between the 3 pans.

Bake for 25-28 minutes or until a cake tester or wooden toothpick inserted in the center comes out clean.  Let the layers cool in the pans for 10 minutes, then turn out onto wire racks, carefully peel off the paper and allow to cool completely.  (I baked for 25 minutes.  To ensure I could make a whole cake this month … you might remember last month half of one of my layers crumbled when I removed it from the pan … I let the cakes cool almost 20 minutes in the pans.  When I took the cakes from the oven they were nice and high in the pans, but they did “settle” a bit upon cooling.)

For the filling  (I made 1 and 1/2 times the recipe … next time will double!)
1 can (20 ounce) crushed pineapple in juice (no added sugar)
1 cup sugar
¼ cup freshly squeezed lime juice
1  one inch piece of vanilla bean split in half

Filling method
Combine the pineapple, sugar and lime juice in a pan. Add the vanilla seeds you scraped from the vanilla bean.  (I tossed in the vanilla bean pieces for added flavor.  Just remember to remove them when cooking is complete.)  Warm over a medium-low heat, stirring to dissolve the sugar, 2 to 3 minutes.  Raise the heat to medium and simmer, stirring occasionally, until the juices have almost completely evaporated and its turned jam-like in consistency. (This takes a while, do not expect it to happen in just a few minutes.  Watch so it does not burn.)  Let the filling cool completely before using.  Can be made a day in advance and refrigerated.    (Next time I will make the day before!)

Coconut Buttercream   (I doubled the recipe … can never have too much icing!)
3 eggs whites
1 cup sugar
¼ cup water
2½ sticks (10 ounces) unsalted butter, at room temperature
2/3 cup unsweetened coconut milk   (I found this in the Asian aisle in the grocery 
                                                                       store.)
1½ tsp coconut extract   (I used about one teaspoon of almond extract. I have not
                                                                       found a coconut extract that I like.)

Buttercream method
Put the eggs whites in the bowl of an electric mixer fitted with a whip attachment so they are ready to go.

Combine the sugar and water in a small saucepan and place over a medium heat, stirring to dissolve the sugar.  Bring to the boil and cook without stirring until the syrup reaches the sold boil stage, 238 degrees F on a candy thermometer.

Beat the egg whites briefly at medium speed. Slowly add the hot syrup in a thin stream, being careful to avoid the beaters. Continue to whip until the meringue has cooled to body temperature. 

With the mixer on low speed, gradually add the butter, several tablespoons at a time and continue to beat until a smooth fluffy frosting forms.

Add the coconut milk in several additions, scraping down the sides of the bowl well after each addition. Add the coconut extract and mix until smooth.  (At this stage I increased the speed of my mixer to medium-high.   Be patient … it takes some time for this icing to come together!)

To assemble
9 tbsp rum – light, amber or dark   (I used pineapple juice instead of rum.)
Coconut flakes and thin slices of pineapple   (Optional to use as decorations.)

To assemble
Place one layer flat side up on a cake stand.  Sprinkle a generous 3 tbsp rum over the cake.  (I used pineapple juice.) Spread half of the pineapple filling over the layer, leaving a small gap around the edge.  Add the second layer, sprinkle with more rum and cover with the remaining pineapple filling.  Top with the third layer and sprinkle with the remaining rum.

Frost the top and sides of the cake with the coconut buttercream.  Decorate with some thin shreds of coconut and slices of pineapple.

Serve in a "pretty" glass with a paper umbrella!

Serve in a "pretty" glass with a paper umbrella!

You Want Pies With That?: Frozen Key Lime Pie on-a-stick, dipped in Chocolate

No fork needed ... Frozen Key Lime Pie on-a-stick, dipped in chocolate.

No fork needed ... Frozen Key Lime Pie on-a-stick, dipped in chocolate.

OUR HOSTESS: Ellen at Kittymama is our hostess this month and she is taking us all down that nostalgic path with Childhood Memory Pies!

OUR YOU WANT PIES WITH THAT CHALLENGEChildhood Memory Pie: Bake a pie or tart that is inspired by a favorite childhood memory. Maybe you spent a summer vacation in Maine so it’s a blueberry pie; or your grandmother always baked lemon meringue, or you remember your first taste of apple pie ever. Tell us a little story that will help us walk down memory lane with you and relive some happy childhood memories

 
When I think of our Florida Keys vacations  … I remember feeling totally separated from the rest of the world.  The islands stretch 100 miles away from the mainland. 
I remember everything felt and smelled “tropical”.

I REMEMBER KEY LIME PIE !!

I don’t remember exactly when it started appearing on a stick, dipped in chocolate, but it didn’t take my family long to make the switch from fork to stick.  Over the years, I have used many different recipes, but I am sharing with you my “current favorite”.  It is a frozen key lime recipe by Nora Ephron.  This recipe has been adapted with an extra step that brings the eggs to the proper temperature rather then using them uncooked.

Sugar Cone Crust:    Rather than the usual graham cracker crust I like to use a sugar cone crust.   A standard size box typically has 12 cones.  Finely grind all 12 sugar cones in a food processor.  Place the crumbs in a bowl and add 6-7  tablespoons of melted butter, stirring until combined.  Press the crumbs onto the bottom of your 9 inch disposable pan and up the sides about 1 and 1/2 inches.   Place in the freezer while you are making the filling.

Frozen Key Lime Pie
Serves 8   (In my world it only serves 6)

6  large egg yolks
1  cup freshly squeezed lime juice   (I use fresh key limes when they are available. 
                                                         One pound of key limes yields about 3/4 cup of juice.
                                                         To “maximize the juice potential” microwave the limes
                                                          for about 45 seconds and roll them on the counter
                                                          prior to juicing.)
2  cans (14 ounces each) sweetened condensed milk
1  Tablespoon finely grated Key Lime zest

Making the pie filling:     In a large heatproof bowl, whisk the yolks and lime juice together.  (I like to beat the egg yolks until they begin to increase in volume and then add the lime juice and whisk until combined.)   Place the bowl over a saucepan of simmering water, and cook  (keep whisking the whole time) until the mixture is foamy and smooth looking and reaches 160 degrees on an instant read thermometer.  Remove the bowl from the heat and whisk in the 2 cans of sweetened condensed milk and the key lime zest until well combined.

Remove the sugar cone pie crust from the freezer and pour in the filling.  Using a rubber spatula, smooth the top.  Place in the freezer. 

DEBBIE’S METHOD FOR ADDING STICKS:  Now is when you have to make the really important decision … does your pie serve 6 or 8!    After approximately 50 minutes in the freezer remove the pie and with a knife, gently score the top of the pie to indicate where your cutting lines will be.  These lines will help you determine the placement of your “sticks”.  You will be using a sharp knife to cut slits, the width of your sticks, in the outside of your disposable foil pan.  You will need to determine midway up the pie from the bottom and the middle of each piece of pie.  (This is where you will use the score marks you made on the top of the pie filling.)  Once you have made the slit in the foil pan, slowly insert a stick.  You are trying to position the stick to as close to the center of each piece of pie as possible.  The better you are at finding the center … the sturdier your finished product will be.  When you have finished inserting the sticks, cover the pie and return to the freezer.  I leave it in the freezer overnight.

"Sticks have been inserted thru the foil pan into the semi-frozen pie.

"Sticks" have been inserted thru the foil pan into the semi-frozen pie.

DEBBIE’S METHOD FOR UNMOLDING PIE:   With scissors, snip from the top of your tin, down towards each stick.  Next carefully peel the foil pan away from the pie.  This will release the pie from the pan.  Use a sharp knife and cut your pie into pieces.  Each piece will have a stick handle!  The pie will not be difficult to cut as it has a frozen, chewy-candy-like consistency.  Return the pie slices to the freezer until you are ready to dip in chocolate.

The pie has been released from the foil pan and is ready to slice.

The pie has been released from the foil pan and is ready to slice.

 DIPPING THE FROZEN KEY LIME PIE:    In a heatproof bowl, over simmering water, I melted milk chocolate chips.  (Use your favorite chocolate.)    Dip each piece in chocolate, place on a parchment paper lined sheet pan and return to the freezer.  Once the chocolate has set you can wrap each individual piece.

Enjoy pie on a stick!

Enjoy pie on a stick!

“Pig in a Bag” – Pork Roast and Vegetables

“Pig  in  a  Bag”
Pork roast rubbed with Northwoods Seasoning

Yellow and orange carrots, gold and purple potatoes and onion

Pork roast and vegetables all bagged up!

Pork roast and vegetables all bagged up!

 You will need:    5 lb   pork roast  and your favorite vegetables
                               seasoning for the roast    (I used Penzey’s Northwoods Seasoning)
                               1  oven cooking bag 

         In the bag:   Place your seasoned roast and vegetables into a cooking bag.                                         Secure with the provided tie.  Set bag in an oven proof baking dish.

      In the oven:     Pre-heat your oven to 300 – 325 degrees.
                                Place on the center oven rack.  I like to cook the roast slow, until
                                the internal temperature reaches 145 to 150 degrees. 

The pork roast is very tender and juicy.

The pork roast is very tender and juicy.

I took the leftover pork roast, shredded it and mixed with barbecue sauce!
"Pig in a Bag" on a bun!

"Pig in a Bag" on a bun!

Outdoor Grilling: Rib Eye Steaks

Grilled Rib Eye Steaks served with sliced tomatos and fried corn

Grilled Ribeye Steaks served with sliced tomatoes and fried corn fresh off the cob.

This was the first meal prepared on my new Charmglow gas grill.   (Turning on that tank of gas is so much easier than firing up coals!)   In searching the web for grilling recipes we came upon the following site and this great YouTube video: Grilled Ribeye Steaks on the Barbecue.  The guy narrating the video has an unbelievable voice! 

Ingredients:
1 to 11/2 lbs. each (1”-2” thick) Rib Eye steaks   (I used 8 oz ribeye steaks.  Next time I would go a little bigger and thicker but probably not as big as the receipe says!  Was not able to get bone-in.)
One large sliced Sweet onion     (I used sweet Georgia Vadalia onions.)
Diced Scallion or green onion
Diced celery     (Did not use celery … used more scallions.)
Olive oil    (Used butter.)
Salt and Pepper

Why is the Rib Eye Steak one of the most popular steaks on the grill? The Rib Eye Steak, or Ribeye, (also known as the Delmonico or Scotch Fillet (Australia)), is a beef steak from the small end of the rib roast. When the Rib Eye section of the beef is cut into steaks, it is one of the most tasty, tender and juiciest steaks available. This is because the meat from the rib section is tender and fattier or “marbled” more than most other parts of the steer. This extra fat makes Rib Eye steaks and roasts especially tender and flavorful. Try to get the Bone-In “first cut of rib” for an extra special Rib-Eye that only a seared steak-bone can give you.

Turn your grill on, place your cast iron skillet inside the grill, close the lid and stabilize the temperature at 4oo degrees.   Add “some” butter to the cast iron skillet and sautee the sliced sweet onions.  Next time I will let the onions get a little more color.

Sweet Vadalia onions sauteed in butter on the grill.

Sweet Vadalia onions sauteeing in butter on the grill.

Remove the onions to a bowl and cover with foil to keep warm … or you can keep them warm on a side burner on your grill.   The steaks were seasoned with salt and pepper and placed on the grill.  The cooking  time  will vary with the size of your steaks, the temperature of your grill and your personal preference of “doneness”. 

Ribeye steaks on the grill.

Ribeye steaks on the grill.

Next, you will need to sautee the scallions, celery (if you use it) and garlic in the cast iron skillet.  Again I used butter.  Try to time the steaks and the sauteeing vegetables to finish at about the same time.

Scallions and garlic sauteeing ...  steaks almost ready.

Scallions and garlic sauteeing ... steaks almost ready.

You will use the skillet for presenting and serving your steaks.  When the steaks are done put them in the skillet and spoon the scallions, celery and garlic mixture on top.  Then add your sauteed onions.

Steaks topped with scallions, garlic and onions.

Steaks topped with scallions, garlic and onions.

Ready to serve!

Ready to serve!

Daring Bakers: STRUDEL

Apple ...  Pineapple and Maraschino Cherry ...  Cherry Cheese

Cherry Cheese ... Pineapple and Maraschino Cherry ... Apple

The May Daring Bakers’ challenge was hosted by Linda of make life sweeter! and Courtney of Coco Cooks.  They chose Apple Strudel from the recipe book Kaffeehaus: Exquisite Desserts from the Classic Cafés of Vienna, Budapest and Prague by Rick Rodgers.

Courtney and Linda told us that they picked a recipe that is all about technique.   But they also picked the “right” strudel dough recipe.   I am in love with this dough.  It handled like a dream and before I knew it, with a little rolling and a bit of stretching, the double batch I had made almost entirely covered my 52 inch x 52 inch table! 

This dough handled like a dream!

This dough handled like a dream!

Stretched paper thin!

Stretched paper thin!

My Grandmother would tell me that you knew the dough was thin enough when you could see the lines on the palm of your hand thru the dough.   I think she would be proud of me … you can even read thru it!  As I was making this dough I would remember things she told me about dough stretching … never stretch dough in an area where you could get a cool draft … the best dough stretching temperature is when you have just a bead of sweat on your forehead.   The stretching cloths I used belonged to my great grandmother and were passed down to my grandmother and now my Sister and I share them for our poviticia and strudel making.

Strudel dough    (I doubled this recipe.)
from “Kaffeehaus – Exquisite Desserts from the Classic Cafés of Vienna, Budapest and Prague” by Rick Rodgers

1 1/3 cups (200 g) unbleached flour
1/8 teaspoon salt
7 tablespoons (105 ml) water, plus more if needed    (I did not need more water.  The conditions in my kitchen must have been ideal on the afternoon I baked.)
2 tablespoons (30 ml) vegetable oil, plus additional for coating the dough
1/2 teaspoon cider vinegar

1. Combine the flour and salt in a stand-mixer fitted with the paddle attachment.  Mix the water, oil and vinegar in a measuring cup.  Add the water/oil mixture to the flour with the mixer on low speed.  You will get a soft dough.  Make sure it is not too dry, add a little more water if necessary.   Take the dough out of the mixer.  Change to the dough hook.  Put the dough ball back in the mixer.  Let the dough knead on medium until you get a soft dough ball with a somewhat rough surface.

2. Take the dough out of the mixer and continue kneading by hand on an unfloured work surface.  Knead for about 2 minutes.  Pick up the dough and throw it down hard onto your working surface occasionally.  Shape the dough into a ball and transfer it to a plate.  Oil the top of the dough ball lightly.  Cover the ball tightly with plastic wrap.  Allow to stand for 30-90 minutes (longer is better).  (I let my dough rest for a full 2 hours.)

3. It would be best if you have a work area that you can walk around on all sides like a 36 inch (90 cm) round table or a work surface of 23 x 38 inches (60 x 100 cm).  Cover your working area with table cloth, dust it with flour and rub it into the fabric.  Put your dough ball in the middle and roll it out as much as you can.  Pick the dough up by holding it by an edge.  This way the weight of the dough and gravity can help stretching it as it hangs.  Using the back of your hands to gently stretch and pull the dough.  You can use your forearms to support it.

4. The dough will become too large to hold.  Put it on your work surface.  Leave the thicker edge of the dough to hang over the edge of the table.  Place your hands underneath the dough and stretch and pull the dough thinner using the backs of your hands.  Stretch and pull the dough until it’s about 2 feet (60 cm) wide and 3 feet (90 cm) long, it will be tissue-thin by this time.  Cut away the thick dough around the edges with scissors.  The dough is now ready to be filled.

Fillings on the dough and ready to be rolled!

Fillings on the dough and ready to be rolled!

Grandma always said to make sure you lightly butter the dough immediately after you have finished stretching and prior to adding the filling.  My Great Grandmother was well known for her “multi-filling” strudels.  If she did not have enough apples for the whole strudel she would use what else she had on hand.   So my strudel is a tribute to my Great Grandmother Roper!

After I lightly buttered the stretched dough, I added a light dusting of graham cracker crumbs.

FILLINGS: 

Apple:  I used about 2 pounds of Granny Smith Apples, peeled, quartered and thinly sliced.  Once arranged on the dough, sprinkle the apples lightly with sugar (used just short of 1/2 cup) and dust with apple pie spice .

Pineapple and Maraschino Cherry:  Sprinkle (lots of sprinkling going on with the strudel) about 1 cup of finely ground walnuts on the area where you will place your filling.   You will need about 3 cups of fresh pineapple that has been diced into small pieces and pressed to remove a good bit of the juice.  If you do not remove some of the juice your strudel will be mushy.  Place the pineapple over the ground walnuts.  Next add about 3/4 cup of maraschino cherries that have been finely diced.  Sprinkle sugar over the filling (I used about 1/2 cup).  You can add golden raisins if you like.  (I intended to use them but forgot!)

Cherry Cheese:  I used Gale Gand’s Cherry Cheese filling recipe.  Adjust the recipe as necessary to fit the size of strudel you are making.

Time to roll it up!

The rolling begins!

The rolling begins!

As you roll the strudel, add a layer of the cheese mixture to the cherry filling. 

I added the cheese filling as we rolled the strudel.

I added the cheese filling as we rolled the strudel.

Almost done!

Almost done!

Rolling complete!

Rolling complete!

The rolled strudel is coiled (in snake fashion) and transferred to a full sheet pan and brushed with butter.  It is baked in a 375 degree oven for about 45 minutes.  With the size of this strudel you want to get as much baking time as possible without burning the dough.  It is best to let the strudel cool prior to slicing.

Cherry Cheese and Apple

Cherry Cheese and Apple

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