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“Bundt” is not a flavor — it’s a shape!

Marble Bundt Cake with Truffle Center

Marble Bundt Cake with Truffle Center

 WELCOME  GARDNER  NEWS  READERS

 I have been introduced to a whole new world … the “World of Bundt”.  Bundt is not a flavor  … it is a shape.  It is simply the name used to identify a dessert cake baked in a Bundt pan.  These cakes are typically made from dense, rich cake recipes using Paula Deen amounts of butter or shortening.  These cakes keep well and require little embellishment, maybe just a drizzle of glaze or a dusting of powdered sugar.

If a home has a kitchen, more often than not there is a Bundt pan lurking in the cabinet – in two out of three American households to be exact.  According to David Dalquist of Nordic Ware, there are nearly 60 million Bundt pans across the continent.  Now I am having a hard time believing this, as I am convinced that the only Bundt pan residing in Gardner, Kansas is in my home!  Sadly, I got no response to my request for your favorite Bundt cake recipes … but no worries … I will share with you my number one recipe.  For years Nordic Ware sold only a few of these pans.  That is until 1996 when a Texas woman won second place in the Pillsbury Bake-off  for her entry of Tunnel of Fudge Cake made in a Bundt pan.  (If you would like this recipe, contact me.) This started a nationwide scramble for the pan.

After reading everything I could on “all things Bundt”, I discovered that part of the trick to a beautiful Bundt cake is in preparing the pan.  Many bakers say that their biggest issue with these cakes, as great as they are, is to get them out of the pan in one piece.  Here is the miracle solution … mix equal parts of shortening, oil and flour (I used my food processor.).  Use a pastry brush to reach every nook and cranny. 

Eighty-five percent of Americans say that baking puts them in a holiday mood.  So Gardner, fire up your ovens, grease your Bundt pans and let’s create some Holiday Spirit!


Marble Bundt Cake with Truffle Center

Adapted from recipegoldmine.com
Serves 16

Truffle Center:
3/4 cup whipping cream
4 ounces bittersweet chocolate, chopped

Marble Bundt Cake:
1 cup unsalted butter at room temperature  (2 sticks)
2 cups sugar
4 large eggs at room temperature
2 cups sour cream  (1  16 oz. container)
2 teaspoons vanilla extract
4 cups all purpose flour
2 teaspoons baking powder
2 teaspoons baking soda
1 teaspoon fine salt
4 ounces bittersweet chocolate, chopped and melted
3/4 cup dark chocolate chips
3/4 cup white chocolate chips

For truffle center: Heat the cream to just below a simmer and pour over the chopped chocolate.  Stir to melt completely and then chill until firm, about 3 hours.  (You can use semi-sweet chocolate if you do not like bittersweet. I really like the bittersweet flavor against the sweetness of the cake batter.)

For the cake: Heat oven to 300 degrees F and grease a 12-cup Bundt pan.  (If you do not use the “grease” recipe listed above, you may grease and flour your pan.  I have friends who use the baking spray with flour with good results.  If you use baking spray, wait and treat the pan just before filling with batter.)

Beat butter and sugar together with an electric mixer until light and fluffy. Add eggs, one at a time, mixing well after adding each egg.   Beat in the sour cream and vanilla extract.

Sift together flour, baking powder, baking soda and salt.  Add to the butter/sugar/egg/sour cream mixture in three additions, mixing gently after each addition.

Remove 3/4 cup batter and set aside. This is extra batter for a cook’s treat.

Remove 2 cups of the white batter and stir in the 4 oz. melted chocolate.  Then stir in the white chocolate chips.  The batter is thick so the chocolate chips will not all settle on the bottom. 

Stir the dark chocolate chips into the remaining white cake batter.

To assemble, layer half of the dark and white cake batters into a prepared Bundt pan.  Run a knife through to swirl gently.

Roll and shape chilled chocolate into “truffles” and lay side-by-side in a circle around the Bundt pan.  Top with remaining batters and run knife through to swirl gently.  (When you swirl the batter be careful not to disturb the chocolate truffle balls in your batter.  You can see in my pictures that my truffle center is not rounded.  I must have been having way too much fun swirling.)

Bake cake for 50 to 60 minutes, until a tester inserted in the center of the cake comes out clean.   Allow your cake to cool for a full 20 minutes before turning it out on a cooling rack.   Allow the cake to cool completely before slicing.  (My cake turned out of the pan with no problem!)  You will unveil a beautiful truffle center in each slice!

For the remaining 3/4 cup batter, scoop into greased and floured muffin cups.   Bake 20 to 25 minutes at 300 degrees F or until a tester inserted in the center comes out clean.

Chocolate Bundt Cake with Truffle Center

Grab a fork!

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2 Responses

  1. Re: Bundt’s Truffle Center
    I’ve been wanting to learn how to make chocolate truffles…chocolate candy with a chocolate ganache center. The recipies I’ve seen are more difficult than I think it should be. Yours seems quite simple to do! How is your bundt truffle center different than a candy ganache?

  2. Thanks for sharing this recipe, I will definately
    try it this season. It look’s delicious.

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